Priorities for installation of continuous Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) near to tide gauges

Matt King (University of Tasmania, Australia)

CoAuthors

Christopher Watson (University of Tasmania, Australia)

Event: 2015 Ocean Surface Topography Science Team Meeting

Session: Science I: Mean sea level monitoring: how to reconcile altimetry, tide gauges, land motion and other in situ observations?

Presentation type: Type Poster

It has now been more than 20 years since geodetic measurement of vertical land movement at, or near to, tide gauges (TGs) was proposed. A large number of mainly Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers have been deployed since these recommendations were made, either to explicitly monitor TG motion or, more often, as part of larger-scale scientific and/or government-funded networks. As a result, vertical land movement is now being measured at several hundred sites “near” to tide gauges, although “near” could be tens or hundreds of kilometres. Even allowing for this, there are still a large number of TGs that are routinely used for climate studies that are not presently adequately monitored by geodetic techniques. Here, we report on a priority list of TGs where GNSS data are not available for analysis by the international community. We provide this analysis from the perspectives of two applications: (i) Long-running tide gauges contributing data for studies of long-term sea-level change; and (ii) Tide gauges used in calibration/validation of satellite altimeters.
 
Priorities for installation of continuous Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) near to tide gauges

Poster show times:

RoomStart DateEnd Date
Grand Ballroom Foyer Thu, Oct 22 2015,11:00 Thu, Oct 22 2015,18:00
Matt King
University of Tasmania
Australia
Matt.King@utas.edu.au