Dynamics of the Confluence of Malvinas and Brazil currents, and a Southern Patagonian spawning ground, explain recruitment fluctuations of the main stock of Illex Argentinus

María Luz Torres ( 1 IIMyC/UNMdP-CONICET, Mar del Plata, Argentina. 2 INIDEP, Mar del Plata, Argentina., Argentina)

CoAuthors

Nicolas Bodnariuk (3 CIMA/CONICET-UBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 4 UMI IFAECI/CNRS-CONICET-UBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina., Argentina); Marcela Ivanovic (2 INIDEP, Mar del Plata, Argentina., Argentina); Martín Saraceno (3 CIMA/CONICET-UBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 4 UMI IFAECI/CNRS-CONICET-UBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina., Argentina); Marcelo Acha (1 IIMyC/UNMdP-CONICET, Mar del Plata, Argentina. 2 INIDEP, Mar del Plata, Argentina., Argentina)

Event: 2020 Ocean Surface Topography Science Team Meeting (virtual)

Session: Science III: Mesoscale and sub-mesoscale oceanography

Presentation type: Type Forum

The Argentine shortfin squid (Illex argentinus) sustains one of the world's largest squid fisheries. This squid presents strong interannual fluctuations in abundance, attributed to its semelparous life strategy coupled with environmental influences on recruitment. Several stocks have been identified, but the south patagonic stock (SPS) is the most abundant and the main support (ca. 80%) of the Argentine fishery. SPS spawns in autumn-winter, but there are controversies regarding the spawning ground location. We studied the relationship between the recruitment variability and oceanographic conditions to which eggs and paralarvae are exposed, considering two possible spawning ground locations: Patagonia (P) and Southern Brazil (SB). We tested the hypothesis that the SPS recruitment variability could be controlled by oceanographic fluctuations related to the transport of the egg masses spawned on each of the two grounds, to their retention on the continental shelf and to the attainment of the thermal habitat required for eggs hatching.
To accomplish our objectives we used a 24 years long time series (1993–2017) of catch per unit effort of the squid fishery, a stock-assessment time series as recruitment proxy; geostrophic velocities derived from maps of sea level obtained from satellite altimetry and maps of satellite sea surface temperature (SST). All this information was employed to model the advection of the squid egg masses along the external shelf and slope and to estimate the annual recruitment success. Geostrophic currents were used to compute the advection of the egg masses. Results show that if spawning occurs in Patagonia, 52% of the recruitment variability could be explained. On the other hand, if spawning occurs in southern Brazil, it does not result in successful recruitments for the SPS.

 
María Luz Torres
1 IIMyC/UNMdP-CONICET, Mar del Plata, Argentina. 2 INIDEP, Mar del Plata, Argentina.
Argentina
marialuztorresa@gmail.com